Objects

The items in this online exhibition evoke the stories of American women through the ages.
Start your exploration with these 32 objects. We will share more as our anniversary year unfolds.
Click on any image to begin.

Alice Paul’s copy of Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique, 1963

  Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

Photo by Kevin Grady/Radcliffe Institute

 

Sometimes the importance of a book goes beyond the text itself. Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique, which connects the first- and second-wave feminist movements, was published in 1963 and widely credited with sparking the post–World War II women’s movement. This copy, which connects the first- and second-wave feminist movements, was owned and annotated throughout by the suffragist Alice Paul (1885–1977), founder of the National Woman’s Party and author of the original Equal Rights Amendment (ERA).

Friedan, Betty, The Feminine Mystique, New York: Norton, 1963

Catalog record:

http://id.lib.harvard.edu/aleph/000980689/catalog

Learn more:

Learn more about Alice Paul.

Explore the Library’s Alice Paul collection, which has been fully digitized.

Learn more about Betty Friedan.

Discover more about the Schlesinger Library's exhibit It Changed My Life: The Feminine Mystique at 50.

Watch a 2013 panel discussion held at the Radcliffe Institute: "Fifty Years after The Feminine Mystique":

The following three videos feature highlights from the Schlesinger Library's holdings about Betty Friedan:

Betty Friedan and the National Organization for Women


Gerda Lerner's letter to Betty Friedan about her book, The Feminine Mystique:

 
Heather Min